A YIREH Guide To Packing for Trips with Multiple Climates

A YIREH Guide To Packing for Trips with Multiple Climates

Packing for a trip sometimes feels like a big puzzle - and even more so when you’re packing for multiple climates! Making sure you pack the right items to be comfortable is essential and packing lightly to reduce the amount you’re dragging around with you is the icing on the cake. So whether you’ve got a trip in the works or you’re still dreaming, we’ve put together our tried and true tips for packing for multiple climates.

Create a travel capsule wardrobe - If you need to pack light, maximizing the use of each of your outfits is essential. Creating a travel capsule wardrobe helps ensure you don’t overpack and helps you get creative about making the most use out of your clothing. Check out our blog post where we create a sample travel capsule wardrobe for you.

Wear layers on travel days - I’m all about layering up for travel days while still being comfortable. I like to tie a sweater or jacket around my waist to free up space in my suitcase and to get snuggly if I get chilly. I also make sure to wear my sneakers and pack light-weight sandals. You can also opt to carry any coat or outerwear and stow it as soon as you’re able.   

Keep it light - When choosing your clothing for your trip, pay attention to fabric weights. Pick light-weight fabrics (like rayon or linen!) that will not take up much space and will also wash & dry easily. Also - stick with just one pair of shoes for each climate! (For your cold weather climate, just one pair of sneakers or boots with warm socks. And for your warm weather, just one pair of sneakers or sandals...shoes are heavy! Don’t over do it.)

Packing cubes - If you’ve never used packing cubes, they are such a game-changer. When traveling with my family, we like to use one (or two) cubes per person. On my own, I like to use cubes for various types of clothing - ex: all of my sweaters in one cube, all of my pajamas in one cube, all my undergarments in one cube, etc. This will help you stay organized and stick to whatever fits in the cubes! If you plan to get souvenirs, you could pack an empty backpack or a spare packing cube and only bring home with you whatever fits. (My favorite packing cubes are from Tom Bihn - a bit more on the expensive end but our luggage from Tom Bihn is so high quality I couldn’t recommend it enough!)

Wash as you go - You don’t need to bring a fresh outfit for each day of your trip - just wash your clothes! If you have access to a sink, just hand wash and hang to dry. If your sweaters or pants are too heavy to air dry quickly, just spot treat any stains and place the items in a bag in the freezer. The cold temperature will kill any odors or bacteria. Just remember to remove it with enough time to thaw out and warm up before wearing! 

Have you ever traveled between a hot and cold climate in one trip? What did you pack? What did you learn? Let us know in the comments below.

If you’re having a hard time trying to decide to pack, take a step back to clarify your personal style. Feeling comfortable + being yourself while you make memories is priceless. Take our style quiz here.

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